Thursday, May 28, 2009

M-J de Mesterton Makes Cornish Pasties

Cornish Pasties by M-J de Mesterton, Photo Copyright Elegant Survival 2009

M-J de Mesterton Makes Cornish Pasties


Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton, Photo Copyright Elegant Survival 2009

I’ve been making Cornish pasties since the age of 20. My mother wrote a book about the pasty and its history which was published in 1990, but my method and ingredients differ from hers. The following is my pasty (pronounced “pass-tee”) recipe:

I will not formally transcribe my recipe and method for making pasties, because I never use measurements. I can tell you, however, that they are made with a short crust containing both butter and lard, water, a teaspoon of malt vinegar, and unbleached, plain white flour. Since salted butter is used in the dough, add just a dash of salt to it. I add sea-salt and hand-milled pepper to the filling, which consists of four ingredients, diced very finely: tri-tip steak, which is always well-marbled and never tough; ordinary, high-starch brown-skinned potatoes, turnips, butter bits, and white or Spanish onions. The finely-diced beef and vegetables are tossed together in a mixing bowl with the salt and pepper before being laid upon the dough, dotted with butter and enclosed. The edges are crimped, either on top or on the side of the pasty, and a couple of well-placed slits are made in the top to allow steam to escape. The final product is brushed with a beaten egg mixed with a teaspoon of cream. The pasties are then baked in a very hot oven for close to one hour. Once the pasties have cooled for about twenty minutes, serve with an oil-and-vinegar-dressed lettuce salad. Offer Cornish cream, Spanish or Mexican Crema, or sour cream as an optional condiment. The pasties depicted here, which I made, are the optimum size for a meal; the dough for them was shaped into a ball about half the size of a woman’s closed hand, then was rolled out and cut around a 7″ luncheon plate. Making giant pasties just isn’t elegant, nor is it traditionally Cornish. I also make miniature pasties for parties, by using a tin can or the bottom, inner ridge of the same luncheon plate as a cutting guide. These mini-pasties are easily eaten by hand with a cocktail napkin to catch any pastry-flakes. For a basic short-crust guide, please see my Elegant Apple Pie recipe.

~Pasty Recipe and Pasty Photos Copyright M-J de Mesterton, Author of Elegant Survival



M-J de Mesterton Makes Cornish Pasties

Cornish Pasties by M-J de Mesterton, Photo Copyright Elegant Survival 2009

M-J de Mesterton Makes Cornish Pasties


Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton, Photo Copyright Elegant Survival 2009

I’ve been making Cornish pasties since the age of 20. My mother wrote a book about the pasty and its history which was published in 1990, but my method and ingredients differ from hers. The following is my pasty (pronounced “pass-tee”) recipe:

I will not formally transcribe my recipe and method for making pasties, because I never use measurements. I can tell you, however, that they are made with a short crust containing both butter and lard, water, a teaspoon of malt vinegar, and unbleached, plain white flour. Since salted butter is used in the dough, add just a dash of salt to it. I add sea-salt and hand-milled pepper to the filling, which consists of four ingredients, diced very finely: tri-tip steak, which is always well-marbled and never tough; ordinary, high-starch brown-skinned potatoes, turnips, butter bits, and white or Spanish onions. The finely-diced beef and vegetables are tossed together in a mixing bowl with the salt and pepper before being laid upon the dough, dotted with butter and enclosed. The edges are crimped, either on top or on the side of the pasty, and a couple of well-placed slits are made in the top to allow steam to escape. The final product is brushed with a beaten egg mixed with a teaspoon of cream. The pasties are then baked in a very hot oven for close to one hour. Once the pasties have cooled for about twenty minutes, serve with an oil-and-vinegar-dressed lettuce salad. Offer Cornish cream, Spanish or Mexican Crema, or sour cream as an optional condiment. The pasties depicted here, which I made, are the optimum size for a meal; the dough for them was shaped into a ball about half the size of a woman’s closed hand, then was rolled out and cut around a 7″ luncheon plate. Making giant pasties just isn’t elegant, nor is it traditionally Cornish. I also make miniature pasties for parties, by using a tin can or the bottom, inner ridge of the same luncheon plate as a cutting guide. These mini-pasties are easily eaten by hand with a cocktail napkin to catch any pastry-flakes. For a basic short-crust guide, please see my Elegant Apple Pie recipe.

~Pasty Recipe and Pasty Photos Copyright M-J de Mesterton, Author of Elegant Survival



Friday, May 15, 2009

Exercises to Do at Home

Elegant Survival's Source for Gloves

Ladies' Lambskin Gloves

Ladies’ Lambskin Gloves

I’ve advocated the wearing of gloves on Elegant Survival since its beginning in 2006 (see “The Merits of Wearing Gloves”, my old article). I’ve worn gloves for decades, whether or not they were in fashion. Now, there are even more reasons to wear them. Traditionally, it did not have to be cold outside, as it was on Inauguration Day outdoors in Washington, D.C., for ladies to wear gloves. Gloves will protect your hands from deadly germs and viruses, protect your jewelry from unwanted attention in-transit, and cushion your hands should you trip and fall on the pavement. For reasonable prices and a very extensive selection of glove styles, try Gloves-Online.com

Inexpensive, Tough, Useful Leather Gloves: One of Many Styles at www.gloves-online.com

Inexpensive, Tough, Useful Leather Gloves: Just One of Many Styles at www.gloves-online.com

~~M-J de Mesterton, Copyright 2009

Elegant Survival's Source for Gloves

Ladies' Lambskin Gloves

Ladies’ Lambskin Gloves

I’ve advocated the wearing of gloves on Elegant Survival since its beginning in 2006 (see “The Merits of Wearing Gloves”, my old article). I’ve worn gloves for decades, whether or not they were in fashion. Now, there are even more reasons to wear them. Traditionally, it did not have to be cold outside, as it was on Inauguration Day outdoors in Washington, D.C., for ladies to wear gloves. Gloves will protect your hands from deadly germs and viruses, protect your jewelry from unwanted attention in-transit, and cushion your hands should you trip and fall on the pavement. For reasonable prices and a very extensive selection of glove styles, try Gloves-Online.com

Inexpensive, Tough, Useful Leather Gloves: One of Many Styles at www.gloves-online.com

Inexpensive, Tough, Useful Leather Gloves: Just One of Many Styles at www.gloves-online.com

~~M-J de Mesterton, Copyright 2009

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

School Choice

School Vouchers are a result of poor educational standards, thanks to unions that hire teachers who didn't get more than a C average in school themselves, together with an institutional resistance to accountability and professional improvements. The existence of voucher systems provides competition to teachers' unions, and forces them to create and adhere to higher standards. School vouchers and charter schools were created by groups of parents who were fed-up with a deteriorating public school system that cared more about social engineering than academic achievement. The people at the Washington, D.C. rally feel that they should have the same school choice as President Obama's children, but he is curtailing the program henceforth, and has instructed it to not accept any new students. So, once more, the teachers' unions and the NEA will have a monopoly on public education, and the bar in Washington, D.C. will be forever lowered since they now have no competition.~~M-J

Source: reason.tv
Reason.tv: Home of the Drew Carey Project and other libertarian videos.

School Choice

School Vouchers are a result of poor educational standards, thanks to unions that hire teachers who didn't get more than a C average in school themselves, together with an institutional resistance to accountability and professional improvements. The existence of voucher systems provides competition to teachers' unions, and forces them to create and adhere to higher standards. School vouchers and charter schools were created by groups of parents who were fed-up with a deteriorating public school system that cared more about social engineering than academic achievement. The people at the Washington, D.C. rally feel that they should have the same school choice as President Obama's children, but he is curtailing the program henceforth, and has instructed it to not accept any new students. So, once more, the teachers' unions and the NEA will have a monopoly on public education, and the bar in Washington, D.C. will be forever lowered since they now have no competition.~~M-J

Source: reason.tv
Reason.tv: Home of the Drew Carey Project and other libertarian videos.

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