Saturday, October 30, 2010

Making Cinnamon Toast Finnish-Style

Ingredients for Making Scandinavian or Finnish-Style Cinnamon Toast
The method and ingredients for making baked cinnamon toast are simple, 
and can be adjusted to your taste. 
I soak some day-old home-made bread in milk, cream, a dash of salt, cinnamon and sweetener for a half-minute, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, then bake it on a buttered baking sheet in a low oven (250*) until lightly browned and dry. Let it sit overnight in the oven for a real crunch. Optionally, you can remove the toast after baking it for an hour, and re-coat it in the milk, cream and cinnamon batter, sprinkle it again with cinnamon and sugar, then bake again for as long as you believe necessary. This toast is usually dunked into coffee, as it is meant to be very crunchy.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Making Cinnamon Toast Finnish-Style

Ingredients for Making Scandinavian or Finnish-Style Cinnamon Toast
The method and ingredients for making baked cinnamon toast are simple, 
and can be adjusted to your taste. 
I soak some day-old home-made bread in milk, cream, a dash of salt, cinnamon and sweetener for a half-minute, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, then bake it on a buttered baking sheet in a low oven (250*) until lightly browned and dry. Let it sit overnight in the oven for a real crunch. Optionally, you can remove the toast after baking it for an hour, and re-coat it in the milk, cream and cinnamon batter, sprinkle it again with cinnamon and sugar, then bake again for as long as you believe necessary. This toast is usually dunked into coffee, as it is meant to be very crunchy.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Friday, October 29, 2010

Elegant Green Smoothie

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Buttermilk,  Cucumber, Celery, Radishes, Jalapeño, Parsley, and a  Piece of Lemon Blended together for a Delicious, Health-Promoting Breakfast-in-a-Glass
M-J's Elegant Green Diuretic Smoothie

Elegant Green Smoothie

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Buttermilk,  Cucumber, Celery, Radishes, Jalapeño, Parsley, and a  Piece of Lemon Blended together for a Delicious, Health-Promoting Breakfast-in-a-Glass
M-J's Elegant Green Diuretic Smoothie

Elegant Cornish Pasties

M-J de Mesterton’s Cornish Pasties

OCTOBER 3, 2009
Home-Gardens Yield lots of Turnips, onions and potatoes in Autumn: Use Them the Traditional Cornish Way for a Nutritious, Easy-to-Serve, Elegant Luncheon
tags: Cornish Pasty Recipe, Elegant Meat Dishes, How to Make Cornish Pasties, M-J de Mesterton Original, M-J de Mesterton's Cornish Pasties, Pasty, Pasty of the Copper Country
by M-J de Mesterton

Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton
Devon-Style Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton (Pasties Crimped on Top)
I’ve been making Cornish pasties since the age of 20. My mother wrote a book about the pasty and its history which was published in 1990, but my method and ingredients differ from hers. The following is  my pasty (pronounced “pass-tee”) recipe: I will not formally transcribe my recipe and method for making pasties, because  I never use measurements. I can tell you, however, that they are made with a short crust containing both butter and lard, water, a teaspoon of malt vinegar, and unbleached, plain white flour. Since salted butter is used in the dough, add just a dash of salt to it.  I add sea-salt and hand-milled pepper to the filling, which consists of  four ingredients, diced very finely: tri-tip steak, which is always well-marbled and never tough; ordinary, high-starch brown-skinned potatoes, turnips, butter bits, and white or Spanish onions. The finely-diced beef and vegetables are tossed together in a mixing bowl with the salt and pepper before being laid upon the dough, dotted with butter and enclosed. The edges are crimped, either on top or on the side of the pasty, and a couple of well-placed slits are made in the top to allow steam to escape. The final product is brushed with a beaten egg mixed with a teaspoon of cream. The pasties are then baked in a very hot oven for close to one hour. Once the pasties have cooled for about twenty minutes, serve with an oil-and-vinegar-dressed lettuce salad. Offer Cornish cream, crème fraîche, Mexican Crema, or sour cream as an optional condiment. The pasties depicted here, which I made,  are the optimum size for a meal; the dough for them was shaped into a ball about half the size of a woman’s closed hand, then was rolled out and cut around a 7″ luncheon plate.  Making giant pasties just isn’t elegant, nor is it traditionally Cornish. I also make miniature pasties for parties, by using a tin can or the bottom, inner ridge of the same luncheon plate as a cutting guide. These mini-pasties are easily eaten by hand with a bread-plate or cocktail napkin to catch any pastry-flakes. For a basic short-crust guide, please see my Elegant Apple Pie recipe.~~Recipe and Pasty Photos Copyright M-J de Mesterton
Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton, Copyright 2009


Elegant Cornish Pasties

M-J de Mesterton’s Cornish Pasties

OCTOBER 3, 2009
Home-Gardens Yield lots of Turnips, onions and potatoes in Autumn: Use Them the Traditional Cornish Way for a Nutritious, Easy-to-Serve, Elegant Luncheon
tags: Cornish Pasty Recipe, Elegant Meat Dishes, How to Make Cornish Pasties, M-J de Mesterton Original, M-J de Mesterton's Cornish Pasties, Pasty, Pasty of the Copper Country
by M-J de Mesterton

Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton
Devon-Style Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton (Pasties Crimped on Top)
I’ve been making Cornish pasties since the age of 20. My mother wrote a book about the pasty and its history which was published in 1990, but my method and ingredients differ from hers. The following is  my pasty (pronounced “pass-tee”) recipe: I will not formally transcribe my recipe and method for making pasties, because  I never use measurements. I can tell you, however, that they are made with a short crust containing both butter and lard, water, a teaspoon of malt vinegar, and unbleached, plain white flour. Since salted butter is used in the dough, add just a dash of salt to it.  I add sea-salt and hand-milled pepper to the filling, which consists of  four ingredients, diced very finely: tri-tip steak, which is always well-marbled and never tough; ordinary, high-starch brown-skinned potatoes, turnips, butter bits, and white or Spanish onions. The finely-diced beef and vegetables are tossed together in a mixing bowl with the salt and pepper before being laid upon the dough, dotted with butter and enclosed. The edges are crimped, either on top or on the side of the pasty, and a couple of well-placed slits are made in the top to allow steam to escape. The final product is brushed with a beaten egg mixed with a teaspoon of cream. The pasties are then baked in a very hot oven for close to one hour. Once the pasties have cooled for about twenty minutes, serve with an oil-and-vinegar-dressed lettuce salad. Offer Cornish cream, crème fraîche, Mexican Crema, or sour cream as an optional condiment. The pasties depicted here, which I made,  are the optimum size for a meal; the dough for them was shaped into a ball about half the size of a woman’s closed hand, then was rolled out and cut around a 7″ luncheon plate.  Making giant pasties just isn’t elegant, nor is it traditionally Cornish. I also make miniature pasties for parties, by using a tin can or the bottom, inner ridge of the same luncheon plate as a cutting guide. These mini-pasties are easily eaten by hand with a bread-plate or cocktail napkin to catch any pastry-flakes. For a basic short-crust guide, please see my Elegant Apple Pie recipe.~~Recipe and Pasty Photos Copyright M-J de Mesterton
Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton, Copyright 2009


Elegant Cornish Pasties

M-J de Mesterton’s Cornish Pasties

OCTOBER 3, 2009
Home-Gardens Yield lots of Turnips, onions and potatoes in Autumn: Use Them the Traditional Cornish Way for a Nutritious, Easy-to-Serve, Elegant Luncheon
tags: Cornish Pasty Recipe, Elegant Meat Dishes, How to Make Cornish Pasties, M-J de Mesterton Original, M-J de Mesterton's Cornish Pasties, Pasty, Pasty of the Copper Country
by M-J de Mesterton

Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton
Devon-Style Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton (Pasties Crimped on Top)
I’ve been making Cornish pasties since the age of 20. My mother wrote a book about the pasty and its history which was published in 1990, but my method and ingredients differ from hers. The following is  my pasty (pronounced “pass-tee”) recipe: I will not formally transcribe my recipe and method for making pasties, because  I never use measurements. I can tell you, however, that they are made with a short crust containing both butter and lard, water, a teaspoon of malt vinegar, and unbleached, plain white flour. Since salted butter is used in the dough, add just a dash of salt to it.  I add sea-salt and hand-milled pepper to the filling, which consists of  four ingredients, diced very finely: tri-tip steak, which is always well-marbled and never tough; ordinary, high-starch brown-skinned potatoes, turnips, butter bits, and white or Spanish onions. The finely-diced beef and vegetables are tossed together in a mixing bowl with the salt and pepper before being laid upon the dough, dotted with butter and enclosed. The edges are crimped, either on top or on the side of the pasty, and a couple of well-placed slits are made in the top to allow steam to escape. The final product is brushed with a beaten egg mixed with a teaspoon of cream. The pasties are then baked in a very hot oven for close to one hour. Once the pasties have cooled for about twenty minutes, serve with an oil-and-vinegar-dressed lettuce salad. Offer Cornish cream, crème fraîche, Mexican Crema, or sour cream as an optional condiment. The pasties depicted here, which I made,  are the optimum size for a meal; the dough for them was shaped into a ball about half the size of a woman’s closed hand, then was rolled out and cut around a 7″ luncheon plate.  Making giant pasties just isn’t elegant, nor is it traditionally Cornish. I also make miniature pasties for parties, by using a tin can or the bottom, inner ridge of the same luncheon plate as a cutting guide. These mini-pasties are easily eaten by hand with a bread-plate or cocktail napkin to catch any pastry-flakes. For a basic short-crust guide, please see my Elegant Apple Pie recipe.~~Recipe and Pasty Photos Copyright M-J de Mesterton
Cornish Pasty Made by M-J de Mesterton, Copyright 2009


Thursday, October 28, 2010

M-J's Elegant Autumn Potato Salad



M-J's Elegant Autumn Potato Salad
Like the potato salad that my Swedish grandmother used to make for me, this dish relies upon some bacon, vinegar, and an onion.

Peel, quarter and boil eight medium sized potatoes, or ten small ones. Salt the boiling water. Alternatively, add some Maggi or Knorr chicken bouillon powder.
Boil the potato chunks for fifteen minutes. Drain but do not rinse them. In your cooking pot, sauté eight strips of bacon, finely chopped. Remove the bacon bits with a slotted spoon. and reserve in a small bowl or cup. Empty out  half of the bacon fat. Add two tablespoons of vegetable oil (I use peanut oil) and two tablespoons of vinegar (I use malt vinegar, apple cider vinegar, or white vinegar). If you have it, a tablespoon of concentrated apple juice can be added to this dressing mixture. You will adjust the vinegar and oil to your taste after the initial mixing of all ingredients. Add the potatoes, one finely diced small onion (red, white or yellow), and one diced, unpeeled apple. Grind some pepper into the mixture for taste, and check for salt. Mix gently. Serve lukewarm or at room temperature for  best flavor.
~~Recipe and Photo of Autumn Potato Salad Copyright M-J de Mesterton, 2008 

M-J's Elegant Autumn Potato Salad



M-J's Elegant Autumn Potato Salad
Like the potato salad that my Swedish grandmother used to make for me, this dish relies upon some bacon, vinegar, and an onion.

Peel, quarter and boil eight medium sized potatoes, or ten small ones. Salt the boiling water. Alternatively, add some Maggi or Knorr chicken bouillon powder.
Boil the potato chunks for fifteen minutes. Drain but do not rinse them. In your cooking pot, sauté eight strips of bacon, finely chopped. Remove the bacon bits with a slotted spoon. and reserve in a small bowl or cup. Empty out  half of the bacon fat. Add two tablespoons of vegetable oil (I use peanut oil) and two tablespoons of vinegar (I use malt vinegar, apple cider vinegar, or white vinegar). If you have it, a tablespoon of concentrated apple juice can be added to this dressing mixture. You will adjust the vinegar and oil to your taste after the initial mixing of all ingredients. Add the potatoes, one finely diced small onion (red, white or yellow), and one diced, unpeeled apple. Grind some pepper into the mixture for taste, and check for salt. Mix gently. Serve lukewarm or at room temperature for  best flavor.
~~Recipe and Photo of Autumn Potato Salad Copyright M-J de Mesterton, 2008 

M-J's Elegant Autumn Potato Salad



M-J's Elegant Autumn Potato Salad
Like the potato salad that my Swedish grandmother used to make for me, this dish relies upon some bacon, vinegar, and an onion.

Peel, quarter and boil eight medium sized potatoes, or ten small ones. Salt the boiling water. Alternatively, add some Maggi or Knorr chicken bouillon powder.
Boil the potato chunks for fifteen minutes. Drain but do not rinse them. In your cooking pot, sauté eight strips of bacon, finely chopped. Remove the bacon bits with a slotted spoon. and reserve in a small bowl or cup. Empty out  half of the bacon fat. Add two tablespoons of vegetable oil (I use peanut oil) and two tablespoons of vinegar (I use malt vinegar, apple cider vinegar, or white vinegar). If you have it, a tablespoon of concentrated apple juice can be added to this dressing mixture. You will adjust the vinegar and oil to your taste after the initial mixing of all ingredients. Add the potatoes, one finely diced small onion (red, white or yellow), and one diced, unpeeled apple. Grind some pepper into the mixture for taste, and check for salt. Mix gently. Serve lukewarm or at room temperature for  best flavor.
~~Recipe and Photo of Autumn Potato Salad Copyright M-J de Mesterton, 2008 

Make Your Own Finnish-Style Cheese: Leipäjuusto

Make Your Own Finnish-Style Cheese: Leipäjuusto

SEPTEMBER 29, 2008
by M-J de Mesterton
Leipäjuusto Photo by Teemu Rajala
Leipäjuusto and Cloudberry Jam: Photo by Teemu Rajala

Click Image to Enlarge Recipe


My mother gave me a booklet in 1985, when it was published: Kitsi Finnish Foodways, a publication of Suomi College (now called Finlandia University) for FinnFest 1985. My copy of Kitsi is yellowed. I don’t think my dear, departed mother ever made squeaky cheese, but, working at Suomi College’s Finnish-American Heritage Center, she did draw the illustrations on Kitsi’s cover. Leipäjuusto is an unusual creation that I really like with rye bread, when in Finland. Here is the recipe for making your own Finnish Squeaky Cheese.
Update: I’ve just found my mother’s friend, Beatrice Ojakangas’ blog, where she hosts a richer recipe for leipäjuusto.

Make Your Own Finnish-Style Cheese: Leipäjuusto

Make Your Own Finnish-Style Cheese: Leipäjuusto

SEPTEMBER 29, 2008
by M-J de Mesterton
Leipäjuusto Photo by Teemu Rajala
Leipäjuusto and Cloudberry Jam: Photo by Teemu Rajala

Click Image to Enlarge Recipe


My mother gave me a booklet in 1985, when it was published: Kitsi Finnish Foodways, a publication of Suomi College (now called Finlandia University) for FinnFest 1985. My copy of Kitsi is yellowed. I don’t think my dear, departed mother ever made squeaky cheese, but, working at Suomi College’s Finnish-American Heritage Center, she did draw the illustrations on Kitsi’s cover. Leipäjuusto is an unusual creation that I really like with rye bread, when in Finland. Here is the recipe for making your own Finnish Squeaky Cheese.
Update: I’ve just found my mother’s friend, Beatrice Ojakangas’ blog, where she hosts a richer recipe for leipäjuusto.

Make Your Own Finnish-Style Cheese: Leipäjuusto

Make Your Own Finnish-Style Cheese: Leipäjuusto

SEPTEMBER 29, 2008
by M-J de Mesterton
Leipäjuusto Photo by Teemu Rajala
Leipäjuusto and Cloudberry Jam: Photo by Teemu Rajala

Click Image to Enlarge Recipe


My mother gave me a booklet in 1985, when it was published: Kitsi Finnish Foodways, a publication of Suomi College (now called Finlandia University) for FinnFest 1985. My copy of Kitsi is yellowed. I don’t think my dear, departed mother ever made squeaky cheese, but, working at Suomi College’s Finnish-American Heritage Center, she did draw the illustrations on Kitsi’s cover. Leipäjuusto is an unusual creation that I really like with rye bread, when in Finland. Here is the recipe for making your own Finnish Squeaky Cheese.
Update: I’ve just found my mother’s friend, Beatrice Ojakangas’ blog, where she hosts a richer recipe for leipäjuusto.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Post-Frost Harvest Cookery

Don't chuck out your last tomatoes and peppers, even though they have frozen on the vine before maturation. Taking a tip from French chefs through the ages, I never waste produce. These vegetables are destined for M-J's Original Sauce Ragú, pictured below in the first stage of cooking.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Post-Frost Harvest Cookery

Don't chuck out your last tomatoes and peppers, even though they have frozen on the vine before maturation. Taking a tip from French chefs through the ages, I never waste produce. These vegetables are destined for M-J's Original Sauce Ragú, pictured below in the first stage of cooking.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

The Beets Go On...

...and on, late into October


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Beets continue growing slowly in cold weather. (Beetroot, Beets, Betteraves, Betabel)

The Beets Go On...

...and on, late into October


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Beets continue growing slowly in cold weather. (Beetroot, Beets, Betteraves, Betabel)

The Elegant Miguel Torres

The Elegant Miguel A. Torres, Vintner of Spain

03/07/2010

by M-J de M.
Elegant Survival has been featuring wines by Torres of Spain for three years.
Article by Jay McInerney in the Wall Street Journal, “A Spanish Dynasty Looks Forward”
Excerpt:
The elegant, courtly Miguel Torres has mild blue eyes and dresses in the tweedy style of the English country gentry, also favored by the chatelains of Bordeaux. At the age of 68 he seems to retain a youthful sense of curiosity; he has recently decided to take up Japanese and holds his own in a conversation with his Japanese importer, whose annual visit to the sprawling winery complex in Penedès coincides with my own. He drives a Prius, which seems as much a testament to his modest demeanor as to his passion for environmental issues. He stopped using pesticides 20 years ago and he’s committed to reducing CO2 emissions at the winery 30% by 2020. He’s also bought land in the cooler highlands near the Pyrenees, in case global warming makes the lowland vineyards in Penedès too hot for viticulture in the future.
~~Jay McInerney in the Wall Street Journal, July 3rd, 2010
Elegant Garnacha: TORRES MALENA

The Elegant Miguel Torres

The Elegant Miguel A. Torres, Vintner of Spain

03/07/2010

by M-J de M.
Elegant Survival has been featuring wines by Torres of Spain for three years.
Article by Jay McInerney in the Wall Street Journal, “A Spanish Dynasty Looks Forward”
Excerpt:
The elegant, courtly Miguel Torres has mild blue eyes and dresses in the tweedy style of the English country gentry, also favored by the chatelains of Bordeaux. At the age of 68 he seems to retain a youthful sense of curiosity; he has recently decided to take up Japanese and holds his own in a conversation with his Japanese importer, whose annual visit to the sprawling winery complex in Penedès coincides with my own. He drives a Prius, which seems as much a testament to his modest demeanor as to his passion for environmental issues. He stopped using pesticides 20 years ago and he’s committed to reducing CO2 emissions at the winery 30% by 2020. He’s also bought land in the cooler highlands near the Pyrenees, in case global warming makes the lowland vineyards in Penedès too hot for viticulture in the future.
~~Jay McInerney in the Wall Street Journal, July 3rd, 2010
Elegant Garnacha: TORRES MALENA

The Elegant Aloe Vera Plant

The elegant aloe vera plant is perfect for household beauty and medical use. Cut off a leaf and squeeze some aloe juice onto a burn, blemish, wound or sunburn. Keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, for later re-application. An aloe plant will grow strong and have an elegant shape. Aloe vera plants make perfect hostess-gifts, and an aloe plant already set in an elegant piece of crockery is a welcome gift for almost anyone. Water-efficient aloes would be perfect dorm-room plants as well, since they can suffer neglect with great dignity, and may come in very handy for youthful skin maladies and emergency wound-care.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

The Elegant Aloe Vera Plant

The elegant aloe vera plant is perfect for household beauty and medical use. Cut off a leaf and squeeze some aloe juice onto a burn, blemish, wound or sunburn. Keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, for later re-application. An aloe plant will grow strong and have an elegant shape. Aloe vera plants make perfect hostess-gifts, and an aloe plant already set in an elegant piece of crockery is a welcome gift for almost anyone. Water-efficient aloes would be perfect dorm-room plants as well, since they can suffer neglect with great dignity, and may come in very handy for youthful skin maladies and emergency wound-care.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Cruciferous Vegetables for Good Health


Article about Cruciferous Vegetables in 
The World's Healthiest Foods
The elegant radish can be eaten spread with a little butter, French style, usually as a breakfast component; as a fresh snack with a little salt and pepper, or sliced thinly in a tea-sandwich.
 Radishes are an effective liver-tonic the morning after a dinner party.

Red or purple cabbage is a health-promoting, cancer-inhibiting, cruciferous vegetable.
Green cabbage can be marinated in a salad European-style, stuffed as choux farcí, or stir-fried with other vegetables the Chinese way.
Cauliflower can be sautéed, steamed or baked. Popular methods of preparation include as a component of  casseroles, blanched on vegetable platters with dips,  and served in chunks with tahini sauce.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Cruciferous Vegetables for Good Health


Article about Cruciferous Vegetables in 
The World's Healthiest Foods
The elegant radish can be eaten spread with a little butter, French style, usually as a breakfast component; as a fresh snack with a little salt and pepper, or sliced thinly in a tea-sandwich.
 Radishes are an effective liver-tonic the morning after a dinner party.

Red or purple cabbage is a health-promoting, cancer-inhibiting, cruciferous vegetable.
Green cabbage can be marinated in a salad European-style, stuffed as choux farcí, or stir-fried with other vegetables the Chinese way.
Cauliflower can be sautéed, steamed or baked. Popular methods of preparation include as a component of  casseroles, blanched on vegetable platters with dips,  and served in chunks with tahini sauce.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Cruciferous Vegetables for Good Health


Article about Cruciferous Vegetables in 
The World's Healthiest Foods
The elegant radish can be eaten spread with a little butter, French style, usually as a breakfast component; as a fresh snack with a little salt and pepper, or sliced thinly in a tea-sandwich.
 Radishes are an effective liver-tonic the morning after a dinner party.

Red or purple cabbage is a health-promoting, cancer-inhibiting, cruciferous vegetable.
Green cabbage can be marinated in a salad European-style, stuffed as choux farcí, or stir-fried with other vegetables the Chinese way.
Cauliflower can be sautéed, steamed or baked. Popular methods of preparation include as a component of  casseroles, blanched on vegetable platters with dips,  and served in chunks with tahini sauce.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Health-Promoting Cauliflower



Serve steamed cauliflower with M-J's Elegant Tahini Sauce for a delicious, health-promoting snack or vegetable dish.


~~M-J


Read an Article about Cauliflower 
in George Mateljan's World's Healthiest Foods

Health-Promoting Cauliflower



Serve steamed cauliflower with M-J's Elegant Tahini Sauce for a delicious, health-promoting snack or vegetable dish.


~~M-J


Read an Article about Cauliflower 
in George Mateljan's World's Healthiest Foods

M-J's Elegant Sauce Velouté

Sauce Velouté for an Elegant Dinner Dish Made with Poached Chicken Breasts

M-J's Sauce Velouté Recipe
Save the broth from poaching chicken breasts as shown in a previous post, and make elegant sauce velouté, a classic feature of French cuisine. For this recipe, I would prefer the chicken poaching liquid to contain just salt, white wine, water, and a spoonful of lemon juice.
Make a roux with about two tablespoons each of butter and flour. Stir it until light tan and bubbly.
Add about two cups of chicken broth or poaching liquid, stirring it in quickly.
Cook the ingredients until smooth.
When the sauce is very thick, slowly add a half-cup of cream and incorporate it well, cooking on low heat for another minute. I like to use bamboo tools, because they do not scratch my cookware.



Elegant Sauce Velouté, a French Classic with Many Applications
If you don't plan to use it right away, it is perfectly acceptable to store your sauce velouté in a jar, and refrigerate or freeze until needed. Thaw the sauce slowly in a covered pan or pot, and add some white wine or champagne to taste. Cream may also be stirred-in until the sauce is at the consistency that you prefer. Dress your chicken in this elegant French sauce velouté. It is very good to have at hand for impromptu gatherings, together with some poached and sliced chicken breasts. These two ingredients guarantee you a quickly-prepared, elegant dinner party offering.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

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